Friday, February 22, 2008

Where we're at.

As much as were both really glad to be home, its a really hard adjustment. Everyone keeps saying that culture shock is way worse on the way home, but I think for us its not as much culture shock as just really seriously missing Jinja. Sometimes its really hard to explain our entire seven months to people in a 3 minute conversation. Everyone is so curious and wants to know what it was like, and for lack of an appropriate question people often say, "So, you had a good time?" and were like...ya..i guess? I mean lots of times were good but lots of times were also really hard...kind of like everything in life!! Its really hard to sum up seven months.... Its hard to be motivated to look for jobs or pursue career stuff when all we want to do is look at pictures or listen to african music or reorganize our african stuff or think about africa ALL the time. It kind of feels like being transplanted out of one body and into another. I miss my old body because i really belonged there and i had a special place, and in my new body no one knows who i am and all the other organs are nice but none of them are saved and sometimes its just hard to not have a really close saved organ friend. Okay i pushed that analogy too far but you know what i mean...We just left such an awesome christian community and its really hard to find that kind of community here in canada - in Jinja we could go to bible study 6 nights a week if we wanted to and I cant find a bible study here to save my life. It is really good to be back in my church but at the same time this first sunday back was really hard for me. The energy was totally different and I kept wishing I could look across and see my friends Ronnie and David and Em and Peter playing and singing, and George Haumba with his eyes all squinted shut dancing away, and papa clapping slowly the way he does, and elder ben in his sean john dragon shirt, and stanley in his bow tie, and mama giving me a big hug during the "sometimes i feel like greeting" part. Its the weirdest feeling - so good to be home, yet so hard to be away. We miss EVERYTHING about africa. The sun, the food, the people, the culture, even the dust. I miss never having to be on time. I miss washing my feet at the end of the day and always sweating. I miss POSHO and BEANS. I miss our dogs brownie and blackie. I miss my deckers and my house. I miss bodas. I miss Pauline. I miss DC Jinja. I miss thunderstorms that sound like warfare. But most of all I miss my babies and my friends. We expected to work with babies and love the culture, but we werent expecting to make such amazing friendships. Our friends tell us that theyve never met white people like us before and that weve made such a difference in their lives...theres just no way to explain how whatever difference we made to them, the difference they made to us is 10 times that big. And I think thats the biggest reason that its so darn hard to say goodbye. As hard as we try, we'd never be able to express the change that happened in our hearts and lives. We'll never be able to tell people what its like to walk through the baby's home gate in the morning and have Brian book it over to get a hug, how it feels to cuddle sophie and george as they go to sleep, how incredible it feels to be singing along to Raoul leading worship in Lingala, how at home we felt. The relationships we made with all our friends are like none we have here. They are really indescribable. We just love our friends there in a totally different way. They got to know us so deeply and we got to know them so deeply. We are so thankful for the support that all our friends and family gave us while away. There have been times where we needed your prayers so badly and felt them. We couldnt have gone without the financial support that so many of you offered. We just can't say thank you enough. So from us, we say thank you and God bless you. We're going to continue to post so whenever your bored...check us out. Until next time....

Tuesday, February 19, 2008

Snow removal.....the Dave King way!



Saturday morning I, Amy, decided to shovel the driveway so i took the good ole John Deere out of the shed and took her out for a spin.


This is me driving the tractor and doing a little snow removal.....or its my dad driving it. who knows! :)





There are many benefits to borrowing a tractor to shovel.

1. time saving. In the amount of time it takes to do a regular drive way, you can do yours, and your neighbors...plus a little of the street too!

2. If you've over exerted yourself during the week, no problem! now's the time to pop in the ipod and chill. Comfy seat and heat included.

3. the best part of it...driving the tractor through town to get it the 4km's from the farm to the house! Nothing says hick like borrowing a tractor to shovel your driveway in the city! I love my dad!

Monday, February 11, 2008

Where we're at.

As much as were both really glad to be home, its a really hard adjustment. Everyone keeps saying that culture shock is way worse on the way home, but I think for us its not as much culture shock as just really seriously missing Jinja.


Sometimes its really hard to explain our entire seven months to people in a 3 minute conversation. Everyone is so curious and wants to know what it was like, and for lack of an appropriate question people often say, "So, you had a good time?" and were like...ya..i guess? I mean lots of times were good but lots of times were also really hard...kind of like everything in life!! Its really hard to sum up seven months....

Its hard to be motivated to look for jobs or pursue career stuff when all we want to do is look at pictures or listen to african music or reorganize our african stuff or think about africa ALL the time. It kind of feels like being transplanted out of one body and into another. I miss my old body because i really belonged there and i had a special place, and in my new body no one knows who i am and all the other organs are nice but none of them are saved and sometimes its just hard to not have a really close saved organ friend. Okay i pushed that analogy too far but you know what i mean...We just left such an awesome christian community and its really hard to find that kind of community here in canada - in Jinja we could go to bible study 6 nights a week if we wanted to and I cant find a bible study here to save my life.

It is really good to be back in my church but at the same time this first sunday back was really hard for me. The energy was totally different and I kept wishing I could look across and see my friends Ronnie and David and Em and Peter playing and singing, and George Haumba with his eyes all squinted shut dancing away, and papa clapping slowly the way he does, and elder ben in his sean john dragon shirt, and stanley in his bow tie, and mama giving me a big hug during the "sometimes i feel like greeting" part.

Its the weirdest feeling - so good to be home, yet so hard to be away. We miss EVERYTHING about africa. The sun, the food, the people, the culture, even the dust. I miss never having to be on time. I miss washing my feet at the end of the day and always sweating. I miss POSHO and BEANS. I miss our dogs brownie and blackie. I miss my deckers and my house. I miss bodas. I miss Pauline. I miss DC Jinja. I miss thunderstorms that sound like warfare. But most of all I miss my babies and my friends. We expected to work with babies and love the culture, but we werent expecting to make such amazing friendships. Our friends tell us that theyve never met white people like us before and that weve made such a difference in their lives...theres just no way to explain how whatever difference we made to them, the difference they made to us is 10 times that big. And I think thats the biggest reason that its so darn hard to say goodbye.

As hard as we try, we'd never be able to express the change that happened in our hearts and lives. We'll never be able to tell people what its like to walk through the baby's home gate in the morning and have Brian book it over to get a hug, how it feels to cuddle sophie and george as they go to sleep, how incredible it feels to be singing along to Raoul leading worship in Lingala, how at home we felt.

The relationships we made with all our friends are like none we have here. They are really indescribable. We just love our friends there in a totally different way. They got to know us so deeply and we got to know them so deeply.

We are so thankful for the support that all our friends and family gave us while away. There have been times where we needed your prayers so badly and felt them. We couldnt have gone without the financial support that so many of you offered. We just can't say thank you enough.

So from us, we say thank you and God bless you. We're going to continue to post so whenever your bored...check us out.





Until next time....

Thursday, February 7, 2008

7 months in the blink of an eye...

Hi everyone!

Just wanted to let you all know that after 45 long hours of travelling I am back in Canada safe and sound! It was a really long trip but I'm glad to be back with my family and friends. However I definitly have a jinja shaped hole in my heart...im not sure when I'll make it back there but I miss it very much. Thanks so much for all your prayers for us as weve travelled, weve been in a lot of situations that should have been worse than they were but we arrived home healthy and safe. Thanks so much! God bless you all.

I'm not sure whats going to happen to this blog but if we can find interesting things to write, we will!!

Until next time...